ARCHITECTURE

A global archive of independent reviews of everything happening from the beginning of the millennium


Read our Copyright Notice click here

For publication dates click here



120 Mph Service at Wimbledon

The Sir John Soane's Museum, Lincoln's Inn Fields


All the colours in the wall - reclaimed London stocks individually cleaned up with excellent mortar joints and all that heat in firing new bricks saved





Inside the snail, Saw Swee Hock Student Centre, London School of Economics




Part of Robert Adam's Admiralty Screen, Whitehall - an early commission contemporaneous with his work at Hatchlands



James Gibbs' St Mary-le-Strand



James Gibbs' use of the classical language is a delight



Portico coffering - Royal Exchange building


Christ Church Spitalfields


St Paul's Cathedral


The Pantheon, Paris


Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel






WELCOME to the ARCHITECTURE pages of WORLD REVIEWS!



We have the following reviews in this section :



ARCH0011/1221 click here for:
PEOPLE NOT LAND
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT

ARCH0010/0419 click here for:
CITY REVISTED
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT


ARCH0009/1117 click here for:
THE RSA HOUSES
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT


ARCH0008/0916 click here for:
OSTERLEY PARK
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT


ARCH0007/0113 click here for:
MANIFESTO
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT

ARCH0006/1011 click here for:
HIERARCHY AND PROFESSIONALISM
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT

ARCH0005/PAOLOZZI click here for :
THE COMMISSIONING OF EDUARDO PAOLOZZI
AT TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD UNDERGROUND STATION
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT


ARCH0004/TRINITY click here for :
TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE'S GREAT COURT
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT

ARCH0003/NEWMARKET click here for :
NEWMARKET RACECOURSE
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT

ARCH0002/WOOLNOTH click here for :
ST MARY WOOLNOTH
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT

ARCH0001/LLOYDS click here for :
LLOYDS BUILDING, LONDON
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT





25 January 2022

Local authorities deserve some sympathy in having inadequate funding but it only go so far.

In the height of austerity during the coalition years, they showed gutlessness in resisting the cuts thinking that residents of their neighbourhoods could be squeezed and cheated of statutory rights and not notice or be treated as toothless.

A decade of this and centralisation has left society questioning whether they can fulfil the portfolio of their functions or whether those they have failed with should go elsewhere wholesale.


Some authorities have taken building control fees but failed to perform the function properly.

This is aggravating to the architectural profession who appreciate building control rigour adding to site safety.

Likewise, planning authorities have frequently failed in their statutory duties and performance.

How then can we say leave it to local authorities to determine the volume of development in their area and cut central quota imposition?


Sometimes both the officers and the councillors are not up to their legal duties.

This calls into question the whole structure of democracy.

Attempts to compensate for local authority failing by giving regional mayors power have been made but a truly democratic answer is not so often reached.


Quasi-prefects and quasi-governors do not add much to democracy, if at all.

Other ideas, like democratic consensus, may have to be considered.

If there is sustained or sizeable objection to something locally, not necessarily amongst politicians, even if a majority is available to push it through, the idea should be stayed as there is no consensus.

Accommodate the objection because the turn of those behind it will come as well in a local society.

Or maybe Britain is in the forefront of a new démarche in democracy - the first democratic country to abolish local authorities?

It is not entirely fanciful. The best idea that New Labour produced was direct, non-party election to hospital trusts. Party positions cannot cover the waterfront of views.


Non-party election to local authorities, enshrined in law, might be an answer that has sufficient logic to stay abolition.

Or, maybe, the available majority will push through de facto abolition.













.























'