GARDENS

A global archive of independent reviews of everything happening from the beginning of the millennium


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WELCOME to the GARDENS pages of WORLD REVIEWS!



We have the following reviews in this section:



GARD0007/1023 click here for:
VILLA THURET SCULPTURES IN THE GARDEN 2023
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT


GARD0006/0718 click here for:
JARDIN THURET
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT


GARD0005/0717 click here for:
PARC EXFLORA
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT


GARD0004/0417 click here for:
THE GARDENS OF AUDLEY END
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT


GARD0003/0217 click here for:
e-LUMINATE FESTIVAL 2017
Reviewed by ANDRE BEAUMONT

GARD0002/1224 click here for:
A BRIEF HISTORY OF THYME
Reviewed by DAVE FRANKLIN


GARD0001/0622 click here for:
VILLA CASTELLA, FLORENCE
Reviewed by JOHN WOOLLARD





Kenwood House, Hampstead with its Orangery on the left, viewed from the 'Capability' Brown garden



The Orangery at Kensington Palace. In 1984 Ronald Reagan landed in his helicopter on the lawn, greeted by Margaret Thatcher, on his way to the economic summit



Kensington Palace


*****



Scaly tree ferns, in an urban Mediterranean habitat - could be interesting if they grow full height. It is unlikely you would ever get below -7C especially with a warming world, the limit of their frost resistance.

If carbon dioxide is less than 50% of the cause of global warming then no amount of reducing it is likely to reverse it. [1]

This has profound policy implications - at a time of forthcoming elections in the EU and U.K.



Plant of the thistle family in Edwardes Square, full of splendid specimens. We should forget the prickliness and adapt.

Adapt indeed.

Labour has forgotten the lessons of the post-Ted Heath seventies. The Barber boom did little harm because it was an experiment stopped in time. It was generally beneficial and followed the gloom of Harold Wilson's less than well executed devaluation. The chronic inflation of the seventies was largely kicked off by the oil price shock and perpetuated by Labour luminaries in the trade unions, like Hugh Scanlon and Jack Jones, trying their luck. They loved sitting round the table with their beer and sandwiches in Downing Street.

Labour showed dreadful judgement over the pandemic and pretty poor judgement to date over foreign affairs. Britain is in the lucky position of not having to solicit any nation. It is not in the position in which Callaghan found himself.

Luckily. Everything in Labour's manifesto suggest that it has not learned the economic lessons from the late Wilson and full Callaghan periods.

Lucky, too, that robust negotiation, some of it suggested here, but largely derided at the time by Labour personnel and cheerleaders, has delivered under Rishi Sunak's premiership a workable and respected relationship with the EU as a result of the Windsor framework.

Lucky, too, that Rishi Sunak has not only halved inflation but reduced it to 2%.

The task for the electorate is clear - vote tactically to ensure that Labour is deprived of any majority bigger that Wilson's six seats in 1964, before granting it a larger one when it has to come back to the polls within the year. Wilson passed the test but today's Labour may not.

Labour's manifesto may be titled 'Change' but the campaign to date suggests it means 'Change to woke'.

Given that, it might be better to give Rishi Sunak his own mandate.